How to Install JFrog Artifactory on Ubuntu 18.04 / 16.04

Original Article: How to Install JFrog Artifactory on Ubuntu 18.04 / 16.04

Today we will see how to Install JFrog Artifactory on Ubuntu 18.04/16.04. JFrog Artifactory is the world’s most advanced repository manager designed to integrate with the majority of continuous integration and delivery tools. With JFrog Artifactory, delivering an end to end automated solution with artifacts tracking from development to production becomes a reality.

Artifactory is mostly used by build tools such as Maven, Apache Ant, and Gradle to store respective artifacts in its local repository to be consumption by other applications and tools.

Install JFrog Artifactory on Ubuntu

The easiest way of installing and running Artifactory on Ubuntu 18.04/16,04 is by using Docker. The process is straightforward without dependency/permission hurdles. You just install Docker, download Artifactory image and spin a container.

Step 1: Install Docker Engine

Install Docker. For a quick start, here is the process.

Install packages to allow apt to use a repository over HTTPS:

sudo apt -y install apt-transport-https \
ca-certificates \
curl \
software-properties-common

Add Docker’s official GPG key:

curl -fsSL https://download.docker.com/linux/ubuntu/gpg | sudo apt-key add -

Add stable repository:

sudo add-apt-repository "deb [arch=amd64] https://download.docker.com/linux/ubuntu $(lsb_release -cs) stable"

Install Docker CE:

sudo apt update && sudo apt -y install docker-ce

If you would like to use Docker as a non-root user, you should now consider adding your user to the “docker” group with something like:

sudo usermod -aG docker $USER

Run the command below to see a version of docker installed.

$ docker version
Client:
 Version:           18.09.5
 API version:       1.39
 Go version:        go1.10.8
 Git commit:        e8ff056
 Built:             Thu Apr 11 04:43:57 2019
 OS/Arch:           linux/amd64
 Experimental:      false

Server: Docker Engine - Community
 Engine:
  Version:          18.09.5
  API version:      1.39 (minimum version 1.12)
  Go version:       go1.10.8
  Git commit:       e8ff056
  Built:            Thu Apr 11 04:10:53 2019
  OS/Arch:          linux/amd64
  Experimental:     false

Step 2: Download JFrog Artifactory Docker image

There are different editions of JFrog Artifactory available, check the Comparison Matrix. If you’re not sure, install the OSS (Open Source Software) version. For more features, you can consider the Pro.

Pull the latest Docker image of JFrog Artifactory.

docker pull docker.bintray.io/jfrog/artifactory-oss:latest

For CE edition:

docker pull docker.bintray.io/jfrog/artifactory-cpp-ce

Confirm Docker images:

$ docker images
REPOSITORY                                   TAG                 IMAGE ID            CREATED             SIZE
docker.bintray.io/jfrog/artifactory-cpp-ce   latest              24d943a892ac        43 hours ago        582MB
docker.bintray.io/jfrog/artifactory-oss      latest              58d49856785f        43 hours ago        582MB

Step 3: Create Data Directory

Create data directory on host system to ensure data used on container is persistent.

sudo mkdir -p /jfrog/artifactory
sudo chown -R 1030 /jfrog/

Step 4: Start JFrog Artifactory container

To start an Artifactory container, use the command:

$ docker run --name artifactory -d -p 8081:8081 -p 8082:8082\
   -v /jfrog/artifactory:/var/opt/jfrog/artifactory \
   docker.bintray.io/jfrog/artifactory-oss:latest

You can pass Java system properties to the JVM running Artifactory using EXTRA_JAVA_OPTIONS. Check more on Docker setup link. See example below.

$ docker run --name artifactory -d -p 8081:8081 -p 8082:8082\
   -v /jfrog/artifactory:/var/opt/jfrog/artifactory \
   -e EXTRA_JAVA_OPTIONS='-Xms512m -Xmx2g -Xss256k -XX:+UseG1GC' \
   docker.bintray.io/jfrog/artifactory-pro:latest

Step 5: Running JFrog Artifactory container with Systemd

Systemd is the default init system for Ubuntu 18.04/16.04. We can use it to manage JFrog Artifactory container.

Create Artifactory service unit file.

sudo vim /etc/systemd/system/artifactory.service

Add:

[Unit]
Description=Setup Systemd script for Artifactory Container
After=network.target

[Service]
Restart=always
ExecStartPre=-/usr/bin/docker kill artifactory
ExecStartPre=-/usr/bin/docker rm artifactory
ExecStart=/usr/bin/docker run --name artifactory -p 8081:8081 -p 8082:8082 \
  -v /jfrog/artifactory:/var/opt/jfrog/artifactory \
  docker.bintray.io/jfrog/artifactory-oss:latest
ExecStop=-/usr/bin/docker kill artifactory
ExecStop=-/usr/bin/docker rm artifactory

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target

Reload systemd.

sudo systemctl daemon-reload

Then start Artifactory container with systemd.

sudo systemctl start artifactory

Enable it to start at system boot.

sudo systemctl enable artifactory

Status can be checked with:

sudo systemctl status artifactory

Also check service binding with:

$ ss -tunelp | grep 8081
tcp LISTEN 0 128 *:8081 *:* users:(("docker-proxy",pid=2820,fd=4)) ino:117162 sk:b v6only:0 <->

Step 6: Access Artifactory Web Interface

Artifactory can be accessed using the following URL:

http://SERVERIP_OR_DOMAIN:8081

You should be redirecto to the new Artifactory welcome page.

http://SERVERIP_OR_DOMAIN:8082/ui/login/

By default Artifactory username and password are admin / password

How to Check if Your Linux System is 32-bit or 64-bit Tricks and tips to find the architecture of a running linux machine

It’s always a good idea to know some basics about the operating system you’re running on your computer. For example, you may need to know whether you’re running a 64-bit or 32-bit system so you know which file to download for a program you want to install.

We will show you several different ways of checking whether your Linux system is 32-bit or 64-bit. Some provide additional information beyond whether the system is 32-bit or 64-bit.

The first two methods involves the “uname” command, which prints system information to the screen. If you want more information than just whether your system is 32-bit or 64-bit, type the following command and press Enter.

uname –a

The following information is printed to the screen in the following order: kernel name, network node hostname, kernel release, kernel version, machine hardware name, processor type, hardware platform, operating system. You can find out what the Linux kernel is and what it does at How-To Geek.

The machine hardware name lists whether your system is 32-bit (“i686” or “i386”) or 64-bit (“x86_64”). Notice that the processor type and hardware platform also indicates 32-bit or 64-bit.

To use the “uname” command to only find out whether your system is 32-bit or 64-bit, type the following command and press Enter.

uname –m

This displays only the machine hardware name and indicates, as above, whether your system is 32-bit (“i686” or “i386”) or 64-bit (“x86_64”).

The “arch” command is similar to the “uname -m” command and prints to the screen whether your system is 32-bit (“i686”) or 64-bit (“x86_64”). Type the following command and press Enter.

arch

You can also use the “file” command with a special argument (“/sbin/init”) to find out whether your system is 32-bit or 64-bit. Type the following command and press Enter.

file /sbin/init

The following output is printed to the screen. The text outlined in red indicates whether your system is 32-bit or 64-bit.

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Il percorso formativo ha preparato il personale all’installazione avanzata dei sistemi operativi Server ‘Ubuntu’, alcune in elenco:

  • utenze necessarie;
  • installazione e gestione del RAID;
  • partizionamento e formattazione corretta dei dischi;
  • installazione dei soli programmi utili (per non appesantire il sistema);
  • politiche di rete e sulla sicurezza generale del sistema operativo (firewall);

L’installazione dei sistemi server (sia in ambito Windows che Linux), necessita di approfondite conoscenze sistemistiche. Un solo singolo parametro sbagliato può compromettere le funzionalità basi, la stabilità e la durata in generale del sistema operativo.